LGBTQIA+ & Womxn Relief for Covid-19

— english —

We are setting up an ad hoc relief line for queers, womxn and otherwise marginalized people in Berlin that need support so they can avoid going outside if they’re immunocompromised, chronically ill, asthmatic or elderly.
You can also get relief with the help of this initiative if you are in quarantine and need help.

We offer matching people for:

  • help for shopping/running errands
  • pre-cooking and delivering meals for you
  • matching you with someone to talk to and relief the mental stress
  • help if have no funds left to sustain yourself

If you need help or can offer help, please fill out one of these forms or mail us at relief@karada-house.de (we very much prefer the forms as it is less organisational work):

→ Do you need help? 

→ Can you offer practical help?

→ Can you donate some money?

→ Do you need emergency financial relief? (relief program has been suspended)

→ List of other resources (multilingual)

— deutsch —

Wir organisieren eine ad hoc Hilfe für queere Menschen, Frauen* und anderweitig marginalisierte Menschen in Berlin, die Hilfe brauchen, weil sie ein schwaches Immunabwehrsystem haben, chronisch krank, asthmatisch oder älter sind. Auch Menschen, die in Quarantäne sind und Hilfe brauchen können sich an uns wenden.

Wir helfen Menschen mit einander zu verbinden für:

  • Einkäufe
  • Vorkochen und Mahlzeiten vorbeibringen
  • für Hilfe mit dem psychischen Druck, Leute finden, mit denen man reden kann
  • Hilfe, wenn keine Möglichkeiten (Gelder) mehr vorhanden sind, um sich zu versorgen (wir versuchen es zumindest)

Wenn Du helfen kannst oder Hilfe brauchst, füll bitte die unten stehenden Formulare aus oder schreib an relief@karada-house.de (wir bevorzugen die Formulare, da es für uns weniger Aufwand ist):

→ Formular für Hilfesuchende

→ Formular für Helfer*innen

→ Kannst du etwas Geld geben?

→ Brauchst Du dringend finanzielle Ersthilfe? (Programm wurde eingestellt)

→ Liste weiterer Resourcen und Hilfsangebote (mehrsprachig)


Interview with Ceci Ferox

Dear Ceci, how did you get started with shibari?

Tying & getting tied up is one of my core fantasies since childhood. I got more sucked in to the Japanese side of bondage about 10 years ago.

What is your approach to shibari?

I am super nerdy about everything from rope manufacturing to creating connection and play. Analytical, motivated by learning, comforted by rules, intuitive, creative.


Tying & getting tied up is one of my core fantasies since childhood.

Ceci Ferox


Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

It keeps me sane, it gives me moments of meditation and connection.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

The connective abilities of Hedwig, the scientist in Georg Barkas, the chaotic energy in Tifereth and the movement of contemporary dance. The strength, personalities and imagination of my partners. Breaking the rules by the power of queer. Grotesque, therapeutic and transformative forces of rope.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

I seek to answer the question “why?” and learn through my experiences. I seek inspiration from teachers, but with moderation and intention: most of the time I attend classes with the sole purpose of having fun. I want to allow my growth to happen organically, not forced, not fast. Slow like a tree, steady.


I seek inspiration from teachers, but with moderation and intention: most of the time I attend classes with the sole purpose of having fun. I want to allow my growth to happen organically, not forced, not fast. Slow like a tree, steady.

Ceci Ferox


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

It’s an endless world of learning and invention, the joy of exploration.

What are the things you dislike the most about shibari?

Dogmatism, one true ways, hero and authority worship.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

Understanding of the underlying principles that are common to all styles of shibari so people can start asking why instead of how.

Name some of your essential resources:

My teachers (my tying partners and the people i have studied with privately or in workshops), my dance practice, my rope community in Helsinki.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Meet and learn from Ceci Ferox at Queerope 2020:

16sepAll Day20FeaturedQUEEROPE 2020Shibari Unconference for Queers & Womxn(All Day) Facilitator: Karada House Category:shibariFormat:unconference

(Title Photography by Hans Erik Unneland)


Interview with Xa Na

Dear Xana, how did you get started with shibari?

The entire story? I started because I felt the need for it. Physically I mean. At the beginning of my research, I wanted to be the one in ropes. I just wrote an article for my blog about it, you can find it here: https://xanandrablog.wordpress.com/2020/01/03/what-is-bondage-for-me-and-why-i-do-it

What is your approach to shibari?

I would describe my approach to shibari as intense, personal and deep.

Photo: Thomas Brucher

Shibari keeps me grounded, present, it is every time a real-life challenge that makes me feel alive, focused and at the moment.

Xa Na


Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

Shibari keeps me grounded, present, it is every time a real-life challenge that makes me feel alive, focused and at the moment.

It is an expression of my inner world, so every time it is like I would talk about something that I can’t express in any other way. It’s a “need” to be seen, recognized, listened, it’s craving for communication with the outer world.

And it is also a research of balance, it’s beauty in the storm, which gives me a way out from the inner, unreasonable shapeless chaos that I have inside.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

My inspiration comes from various experiences. If I have to mention life experiences I would say that the research of the beauty of shibari might have been inspired by the schools of Art that I did in the past (both secondary school plus Academy of Art), the music school, and a personal sense of aesthetics.

I like and I feel very much the traditional Japanese Kinbaku style, but I am still ignorant about the story of it, I tend to forget names and dates.

The more close Master that influenced me is Naka Sensei.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

Showing what I do. I am developing a total fascination and love for being on stage performing Shibari and I guess the next challenge would be teaching it.


I like and I feel very much the traditional Japanese Kinbaku style, but I am still ignorant about the story of it, I tend to forget names and dates.

Xa Na


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

That moment, during the session, that feels out of time and space, endless. I love the feeling of handling the ropes in my hands, the closeness with the partners, their resonance with that subtle vibration of reaching every time a limit and go through it. The visual side of it and its research at the moment.

What are the things you dislike the most about shibari?

When a session feels empty when there is no resonance between me and the one in ropes, when people that want to bottom they only search for their satisfaction regardless of my presence, and without any will to communicate.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

How to find their own personal way to express themselves.

Name some of your essential resources:

mmm…”Discover Kinbaku”, formed by Alexander and Natasha here in Berlin, has been the place where I studied the most since I started to practice regularly. I can say that this has been my major resource from where I took the knowledge until now. I also wouldn’t be here doing Shibari if I wouldn’t have met the Xplore Festival and Schwelle7, both founded by Felix Ruckert.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Meet and learn from Xa Na at Queerope 2020.
Or purchase a ticket for her masterclass which is part of Queerope:

 

16sepAll Day20FeaturedQUEEROPE 2020Shibari Unconference for Queers & Womxn(All Day) Facilitator: Karada House Category:shibariFormat:unconference


19sep18:3020:00FeaturedQueerope 2020: "Intention in Ropes" (mixed)Masterclass: Xana18:30 - 20:00 Facilitator: Xana Category:shibariFormat:class

(Title Photography by René de Sans)


Interview with Addie

Dear Addie, how did you get started with shibari?

I started with a partner who was interested and quickly discovered that I enjoyed it, both tying and being tied. I met Barkas a couple of years later at our local kink convention and things snowballed from there.

What is your approach to shibari?

As a person who ties, I want my tying partner to trust me, themselves, and the situation enough to relax the facade of socially acceptable speech and behaviours that we all wear to function in our societies. As a person who is tied, I look for the reciprocal state, moments or situations where I can drop the need to control or to behave, and let my mind or my body or my breathing react as they will. I want to find interactions where I lose track of time. As a person who self suspends, I want to push myself and see what I am capable of under pressure, and where the edge is, and how close I can get to it.


I look for the reciprocal state, moments or situations where I can drop the need to control or to behave, and let my mind or my body or my breathing react as they will.

Addie


Photoygraphy by The Silence

Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

It provides a space outside of day-to-day routine and preoccupation, where people can explore themselves. At its best, Shibari gives people the opportunity to be unscripted in their reactions, and to learn about themselves from the sources of those reactions.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

Barkas has definitely been my largest influence and inspiration. They have a way of creating metaphors for rope practice that sound bizarre at first but end up making a lot of sense on further inspection. I love seeing what they will come up with next, and I love being along for the ride.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

I don’t really find its growth in popularity to be a problem, and it doesn’t negatively affect my personal practice. More interest and popularity has its pros and its cons (I think there are more pros) and as someone who teaches I am happy that there are people who want to learn, especially since I love teaching beginners. For myself, there are times of progress and then periods where I feel stagnant, then another period of growth, the same as learning any other craft. If I feel that I am in a period of stagnation then I take a break from tying for a couple weeks, and that tends to fix things. Pushing oneself to be constantly improving is impractical, especially as the better one is at a skill the smaller the progress steps are.


Pushing oneself to be constantly improving is impractical, especially as the better one is at a skill the smaller the progress steps are.

Addie


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

It has the potential to help people practice conscientious, kind, and impactful human interactions. Observing someone and trying to understand them requires a calm, supportive, patient empathy that we don’t necessarily have a chance to exercise in daily life, except perhaps with dear friends. Spending time trying to understand another helps exercise empathy muscles, so to speak, and that can only be a good thing. Exploring taboos (and bondage is certainly a taboo) also asks us to address what is uncomfortable in ourselves, and hopefully lets us deconstruct insecurities, biases, fears, and other dark bits that don’t often get examined.

What are the things you dislike the most about shibari?

It can be used in ways that I find highly unethical, for the benefit of one person at the expense of another. It requires physical and emotional vulnerability, and I think that people, generally very well-meaning people, sometimes run too deep too quickly and unearth things that they do not then have the time, energy, or support systems to deal with without undue distress.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

This may sound cheesy but I think that giving someone the space to find and address the bits of themselves that they are most unsure of, and then celebrating those things with them, is a kind of love that builds people up, and that many of us don’t get enough of. I would like to show people how to practice sharing that type of affirmation, of caring for someone including their flaws, not in spite of them.

Name some of your essential resources:

Barkas, definitely. I’ve learned most of what I know about rope from them, though I have my own way of using some of those tools. Other than that, lots of conversations with lots of people, and years of seeing a variety of good or less good situations in rope. That collection of experiences, which is still growing, is the basis for most of what I believe matters in Shibari.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Do not miss the Barkas & Addie Masterclass at Karada House:

07nov(nov 7)11:0008(nov 8)18:30Sold Out!FeaturedBarkas & Addie Masterclass – The City of Kinbaku (mixed)11:00 - 18:30 (8) Facilitator: Barkas & Addie Category:shibariFormat:workshop

(Title Photography by Helene Planquelle)


Interview with Barkas

Dear Barkas, how did you get started with shibari?

I saw the facial expressions of a close person and was mesmerized. I wanted to be able to create such facial expression and a week later I signed up for a beginner workshop. Ever since then I am into tying more than anything else.

What is your approach to shibari?

It is hard to say. I don’t think I have one explicit approach to Shibari. Like everyone is different and unique, I try to tie with everyone in a way that suits them and us. If I had to boil it down, I would say, that my approach is a very communicative one that draws from more than just patterns and aesthetics. I tie because I want to get to know the other person. Knowing as in getting an understanding of what moves them.


I tie because I want to get to know the other person. Knowing as in getting an understanding of what moves them.

Barkas


Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

It is the single most interesting field I have encountered. No other practice in my life was so diverse and had room for so many perspectives as Shibari is.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

I try to draw my inspiration from an as far as possible range of different fields. As for Shibari people, there is of course my teacher Yukimura Haruki. The other person that I draw inspiration from in Shibari is Pilar. I don’t know her teachings or her approaches but watching her and talking to her made me questioning the dimensionality of rope itself.
Other inspirations are for sure several philosophers of the French poststructuralist tradition (Derrida, Barthes, Bachelard, Lyotard) as well as some phenomenologists such as Judith Butler and Sara Ahmed.
Architecture is a great inspiration as well as nature itself.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

My way of practicing and teaching Shibari is to embed it in a greater context. I am constantly surprised how much there is that haven’t been thought of yet. My way of challenging myself is to constantly question myself. What is it that I might see from a less ideal angle? And to learn from that reflection.


My way of practicing and teaching Shibari is to embed it in a greater context. I am constantly surprised how much there is that haven’t been thought of yet.

Barkas


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

I feel like it can hand people an image of possibilities that is potentially harmful without acknowledging that possibility. I think that this opens the door for people who have at the least questionable motives. I dislike that it is often not only brought in a close relationship to sexuality but, it seems, it is often confused with sex which leads me to point one.

I think, rope itself, or Shibari, “is” nothing. It is what we fill it with, be it art, sexuality, sport, crafts, meditation, therapy, whatever. I feel like people not accepting this diversity is what I dislike most about Shibari.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

I would like to teach what I think rope can do: Basically anything but mostly that it can be used as a tool to truly and honestly interact with another human being on a level that is not really possible through spoken language. I would like people to see what I have seen.
This and patience 🙂

Name some of your essential resources:

The only resource of essence is life itself and what we have encountered in it. I think that the people who inspire me are also my resources. Of course, I was for a long time (almost a decade) student of Osada Steve and that had an immense impact on my tying but the few years with Yukimura Sensei who taught me to listen and to see were incommensurable and I still see them as resources. My books are a resource. When I think more about it I think I have to say that my greatest resource is always the person I tie with in that particular moment.

Anything else you'd like to add?

We are very much looking forward to teaching the concept of Barkas’ Kinbaku City in Berlin because I think that the people there are very perceptive for this kind of metaphors and poetics. At least in my experience.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Do not miss the Barkas & Addie Masterclass at Karada House:

07nov(nov 7)11:0008(nov 8)18:30Sold Out!FeaturedBarkas & Addie Masterclass – The City of Kinbaku (mixed)11:00 - 18:30 (8) Facilitator: Barkas & Addie Category:shibariFormat:workshop