Kinky Queer Smut Challenge

Karada House is challenging you to write your own little kinky queer smut story!

This idea was born in our queer community hang out and you can be part of it now. We start the story, you take over and make it into your own juicy hot story. Let this writing exercise take you into the depths of you kinky (un)conscious. Give yourself a good time and then submit your story (with your name or anonymous, whatever you prefer) to us.

With all the collected stories we will create a sizzling hot evening of reading kinky queer smut online. Meow.

How this challenge works:

  • We start the story’s first paragraph right underneath this text
  • You pick up the story from there and write your own text.
  • Keep it short-ish (try to stay within the realm of 3.500 words max)
  • Send us your story either via info [a] karada-house.de or in the contact form below

Requirements:

  • You must use the beginning of the story that is written underneath this text
  • You must insert the following words into the story: Leberwurst, flamingo, your mothers panties, humongous
  • Deadline: June 15th, 10pm

This fucking pandemic! After what felt like years in confinement because of the lock down they hardly felt like themselves any more. All that was left was the hollow shell of a person who played along and tried to be a good citizen and a good offspring to their parents with which they were forced to cohabitate with. One more of mom’s fresh baked bread and this shell would burst into one thousand screaming pieces. Was there anything left of the queer kinky smut-loving person that they used to be only two months prior?

They needed to get out of the house! They needed air. And trees and birds and hugs and thirsty gazes and hands all over their body and someone to smack them in the face really hard and pinch their nipples and tell them to cum…

But instead the days were all about doing home office, watching Tagesschau and baking. They needed something else. Something queer and juicy. At least a tiny bit of it to feel more alive so off they went on this sunny day that promised a summer that was already spoilt before it even began.  An hour later they got their trees and birds and queer at Hasenheide. You know, the place right between the lake and Columbiadamm. The cruising area, a little piece of queer kinky slutty heaven…


LGBTQIA+ & Womxn Relief for Covid-19

— english —

We are setting up an ad hoc relief line for queers, womxn and otherwise marginalized people in Berlin that need support so they can avoid going outside if they’re immunocompromised, chronically ill, asthmatic or elderly.
You can also get relief with the help of this initiative if you are in quarantine and need help.

We offer matching people for:

  • help for shopping/running errands
  • pre-cooking and delivering meals for you
  • matching you with someone to talk to and relief the mental stress
  • help if have no funds left to sustain yourself

If you need help or can offer help, please fill out one of these forms or mail us at relief@karada-house.de (we very much prefer the forms as it is less organisational work):

→ Do you need help? 

→ Can you offer practical help?

→ Can you donate some money?

→ Do you need emergency financial relief? (relief program has been suspended)

→ List of other resources (multilingual)

— deutsch —

Wir organisieren eine ad hoc Hilfe für queere Menschen, Frauen* und anderweitig marginalisierte Menschen in Berlin, die Hilfe brauchen, weil sie ein schwaches Immunabwehrsystem haben, chronisch krank, asthmatisch oder älter sind. Auch Menschen, die in Quarantäne sind und Hilfe brauchen können sich an uns wenden.

Wir helfen Menschen mit einander zu verbinden für:

  • Einkäufe
  • Vorkochen und Mahlzeiten vorbeibringen
  • für Hilfe mit dem psychischen Druck, Leute finden, mit denen man reden kann
  • Hilfe, wenn keine Möglichkeiten (Gelder) mehr vorhanden sind, um sich zu versorgen (wir versuchen es zumindest)

Wenn Du helfen kannst oder Hilfe brauchst, füll bitte die unten stehenden Formulare aus oder schreib an relief@karada-house.de (wir bevorzugen die Formulare, da es für uns weniger Aufwand ist):

→ Formular für Hilfesuchende

→ Formular für Helfer*innen

→ Kannst du etwas Geld geben?

→ Brauchst Du dringend finanzielle Ersthilfe? (Programm wurde eingestellt)

→ Liste weiterer Resourcen und Hilfsangebote (mehrsprachig)


Mayfly Performance

Shibari Performance at Karada House Berlin – 22.11.2019

Performance devised by Gestalta & Shantel Liao
Model: Miauleks
Audio Composition: Robert Mirolo & Julia Demartino

蜉蝣之羽,衣裳楚楚。心之憂矣,於我歸處。

蜉蝣之翼,采采衣服。心之憂矣,於我歸息。

蜉蝣掘閱,麻衣如雪。心之憂矣,於我歸說。

ー詩經 曹風 蜉蝣.


The wings of the ephemera,
Are robes, bright and splendid.
My heart is grieved; –
Would they but come and abide with me!

The wings of the ephemera,
Are robes, variously adorned.
My heart is grieved; –
Would they but come and rest with me!

The ephemera bursts from its hole,
With a robe of hemp like snow.
My heart is grieved; –
Would they but come and lodge with me!

“Fu You (Mayfly)” from Odes Of Cao, Classic of Poetry

Artists Websites:
Gestalta
Shantel Liao
Miauleks


Interview with Ceci Ferox

Dear Ceci, how did you get started with shibari?

Tying & getting tied up is one of my core fantasies since childhood. I got more sucked in to the Japanese side of bondage about 10 years ago.

What is your approach to shibari?

I am super nerdy about everything from rope manufacturing to creating connection and play. Analytical, motivated by learning, comforted by rules, intuitive, creative.


Tying & getting tied up is one of my core fantasies since childhood.

Ceci Ferox


Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

It keeps me sane, it gives me moments of meditation and connection.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

The connective abilities of Hedwig, the scientist in Georg Barkas, the chaotic energy in Tifereth and the movement of contemporary dance. The strength, personalities and imagination of my partners. Breaking the rules by the power of queer. Grotesque, therapeutic and transformative forces of rope.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

I seek to answer the question “why?” and learn through my experiences. I seek inspiration from teachers, but with moderation and intention: most of the time I attend classes with the sole purpose of having fun. I want to allow my growth to happen organically, not forced, not fast. Slow like a tree, steady.


I seek inspiration from teachers, but with moderation and intention: most of the time I attend classes with the sole purpose of having fun. I want to allow my growth to happen organically, not forced, not fast. Slow like a tree, steady.

Ceci Ferox


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

It’s an endless world of learning and invention, the joy of exploration.

What are the things you dislike the most about shibari?

Dogmatism, one true ways, hero and authority worship.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

Understanding of the underlying principles that are common to all styles of shibari so people can start asking why instead of how.

Name some of your essential resources:

My teachers (my tying partners and the people i have studied with privately or in workshops), my dance practice, my rope community in Helsinki.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Meet and learn from Ceci Ferox at Queerope 2020:

16sepAll Day20FeaturedQUEEROPE 2020Shibari Unconference for Queers & Womxn(All Day) Facilitator: Karada House Category:shibariFormat:unconference

(Title Photography by Hans Erik Unneland)


Read other Interviews


Interview with Xa Na

Dear Xana, how did you get started with shibari?

The entire story? I started because I felt the need for it. Physically I mean. At the beginning of my research, I wanted to be the one in ropes. I just wrote an article for my blog about it, you can find it here: https://xanandrablog.wordpress.com/2020/01/03/what-is-bondage-for-me-and-why-i-do-it

What is your approach to shibari?

I would describe my approach to shibari as intense, personal and deep.

Photo: Thomas Brucher

Shibari keeps me grounded, present, it is every time a real-life challenge that makes me feel alive, focused and at the moment.

Xa Na


Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

Shibari keeps me grounded, present, it is every time a real-life challenge that makes me feel alive, focused and at the moment.

It is an expression of my inner world, so every time it is like I would talk about something that I can’t express in any other way. It’s a “need” to be seen, recognized, listened, it’s craving for communication with the outer world.

And it is also a research of balance, it’s beauty in the storm, which gives me a way out from the inner, unreasonable shapeless chaos that I have inside.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

My inspiration comes from various experiences. If I have to mention life experiences I would say that the research of the beauty of shibari might have been inspired by the schools of Art that I did in the past (both secondary school plus Academy of Art), the music school, and a personal sense of aesthetics.

I like and I feel very much the traditional Japanese Kinbaku style, but I am still ignorant about the story of it, I tend to forget names and dates.

The more close Master that influenced me is Naka Sensei.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

Showing what I do. I am developing a total fascination and love for being on stage performing Shibari and I guess the next challenge would be teaching it.


I like and I feel very much the traditional Japanese Kinbaku style, but I am still ignorant about the story of it, I tend to forget names and dates.

Xa Na


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

That moment, during the session, that feels out of time and space, endless. I love the feeling of handling the ropes in my hands, the closeness with the partners, their resonance with that subtle vibration of reaching every time a limit and go through it. The visual side of it and its research at the moment.

What are the things you dislike the most about shibari?

When a session feels empty when there is no resonance between me and the one in ropes, when people that want to bottom they only search for their satisfaction regardless of my presence, and without any will to communicate.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

How to find their own personal way to express themselves.

Name some of your essential resources:

mmm…”Discover Kinbaku”, formed by Alexander and Natasha here in Berlin, has been the place where I studied the most since I started to practice regularly. I can say that this has been my major resource from where I took the knowledge until now. I also wouldn’t be here doing Shibari if I wouldn’t have met the Xplore Festival and Schwelle7, both founded by Felix Ruckert.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Meet and learn from Xa Na at Queerope 2020.
Or purchase a ticket for her masterclass which is part of Queerope:

 

16sepAll Day20FeaturedQUEEROPE 2020Shibari Unconference for Queers & Womxn(All Day) Facilitator: Karada House Category:shibariFormat:unconference


19sep18:3020:00FeaturedQueerope 2020: "Intention in Ropes" (mixed)Masterclass: Xana18:30 - 20:00 Facilitator: Xana Category:shibariFormat:class

(Title Photography by René de Sans)


Interview with Addie

Dear Addie, how did you get started with shibari?

I started with a partner who was interested and quickly discovered that I enjoyed it, both tying and being tied. I met Barkas a couple of years later at our local kink convention and things snowballed from there.

What is your approach to shibari?

As a person who ties, I want my tying partner to trust me, themselves, and the situation enough to relax the facade of socially acceptable speech and behaviours that we all wear to function in our societies. As a person who is tied, I look for the reciprocal state, moments or situations where I can drop the need to control or to behave, and let my mind or my body or my breathing react as they will. I want to find interactions where I lose track of time. As a person who self suspends, I want to push myself and see what I am capable of under pressure, and where the edge is, and how close I can get to it.


I look for the reciprocal state, moments or situations where I can drop the need to control or to behave, and let my mind or my body or my breathing react as they will.

Addie


Photoygraphy by The Silence

Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

It provides a space outside of day-to-day routine and preoccupation, where people can explore themselves. At its best, Shibari gives people the opportunity to be unscripted in their reactions, and to learn about themselves from the sources of those reactions.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

Barkas has definitely been my largest influence and inspiration. They have a way of creating metaphors for rope practice that sound bizarre at first but end up making a lot of sense on further inspection. I love seeing what they will come up with next, and I love being along for the ride.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

I don’t really find its growth in popularity to be a problem, and it doesn’t negatively affect my personal practice. More interest and popularity has its pros and its cons (I think there are more pros) and as someone who teaches I am happy that there are people who want to learn, especially since I love teaching beginners. For myself, there are times of progress and then periods where I feel stagnant, then another period of growth, the same as learning any other craft. If I feel that I am in a period of stagnation then I take a break from tying for a couple weeks, and that tends to fix things. Pushing oneself to be constantly improving is impractical, especially as the better one is at a skill the smaller the progress steps are.


Pushing oneself to be constantly improving is impractical, especially as the better one is at a skill the smaller the progress steps are.

Addie


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

It has the potential to help people practice conscientious, kind, and impactful human interactions. Observing someone and trying to understand them requires a calm, supportive, patient empathy that we don’t necessarily have a chance to exercise in daily life, except perhaps with dear friends. Spending time trying to understand another helps exercise empathy muscles, so to speak, and that can only be a good thing. Exploring taboos (and bondage is certainly a taboo) also asks us to address what is uncomfortable in ourselves, and hopefully lets us deconstruct insecurities, biases, fears, and other dark bits that don’t often get examined.

What are the things you dislike the most about shibari?

It can be used in ways that I find highly unethical, for the benefit of one person at the expense of another. It requires physical and emotional vulnerability, and I think that people, generally very well-meaning people, sometimes run too deep too quickly and unearth things that they do not then have the time, energy, or support systems to deal with without undue distress.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

This may sound cheesy but I think that giving someone the space to find and address the bits of themselves that they are most unsure of, and then celebrating those things with them, is a kind of love that builds people up, and that many of us don’t get enough of. I would like to show people how to practice sharing that type of affirmation, of caring for someone including their flaws, not in spite of them.

Name some of your essential resources:

Barkas, definitely. I’ve learned most of what I know about rope from them, though I have my own way of using some of those tools. Other than that, lots of conversations with lots of people, and years of seeing a variety of good or less good situations in rope. That collection of experiences, which is still growing, is the basis for most of what I believe matters in Shibari.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Do not miss the Barkas & Addie Masterclass at Karada House:

07nov(nov 7)11:0008(nov 8)18:30FeaturedBarkas & Addie Masterclass – The City of Kinbaku (mixed)11:00 - 18:30 (8) Facilitator: Barkas & Addie Category:shibariFormat:workshop

(Title Photography by Helene Planquelle)


Interview with Barkas

Dear Barkas, how did you get started with shibari?

I saw the facial expressions of a close person and was mesmerized. I wanted to be able to create such facial expression and a week later I signed up for a beginner workshop. Ever since then I am into tying more than anything else.

What is your approach to shibari?

It is hard to say. I don’t think I have one explicit approach to Shibari. Like everyone is different and unique, I try to tie with everyone in a way that suits them and us. If I had to boil it down, I would say, that my approach is a very communicative one that draws from more than just patterns and aesthetics. I tie because I want to get to know the other person. Knowing as in getting an understanding of what moves them.


I tie because I want to get to know the other person. Knowing as in getting an understanding of what moves them.

Barkas


Tell us about a constant that keeps you coming back to shibari?

It is the single most interesting field I have encountered. No other practice in my life was so diverse and had room for so many perspectives as Shibari is.

Who are or what are you inspired by from practicing shibari?

I try to draw my inspiration from an as far as possible range of different fields. As for Shibari people, there is of course my teacher Yukimura Haruki. The other person that I draw inspiration from in Shibari is Pilar. I don’t know her teachings or her approaches but watching her and talking to her made me questioning the dimensionality of rope itself.
Other inspirations are for sure several philosophers of the French poststructuralist tradition (Derrida, Barthes, Bachelard, Lyotard) as well as some phenomenologists such as Judith Butler and Sara Ahmed.
Architecture is a great inspiration as well as nature itself.

How do you continue to challenge yourself, within the frame of shibari, as it grows in popularity and attention?

My way of practicing and teaching Shibari is to embed it in a greater context. I am constantly surprised how much there is that haven’t been thought of yet. My way of challenging myself is to constantly question myself. What is it that I might see from a less ideal angle? And to learn from that reflection.


My way of practicing and teaching Shibari is to embed it in a greater context. I am constantly surprised how much there is that haven’t been thought of yet.

Barkas


What are the things you love the most about shibari?

I feel like it can hand people an image of possibilities that is potentially harmful without acknowledging that possibility. I think that this opens the door for people who have at the least questionable motives. I dislike that it is often not only brought in a close relationship to sexuality but, it seems, it is often confused with sex which leads me to point one.

I think, rope itself, or Shibari, “is” nothing. It is what we fill it with, be it art, sexuality, sport, crafts, meditation, therapy, whatever. I feel like people not accepting this diversity is what I dislike most about Shibari.

What would you like to show/teach others about shibari?

I would like to teach what I think rope can do: Basically anything but mostly that it can be used as a tool to truly and honestly interact with another human being on a level that is not really possible through spoken language. I would like people to see what I have seen.
This and patience 🙂

Name some of your essential resources:

The only resource of essence is life itself and what we have encountered in it. I think that the people who inspire me are also my resources. Of course, I was for a long time (almost a decade) student of Osada Steve and that had an immense impact on my tying but the few years with Yukimura Sensei who taught me to listen and to see were incommensurable and I still see them as resources. My books are a resource. When I think more about it I think I have to say that my greatest resource is always the person I tie with in that particular moment.

Anything else you'd like to add?

We are very much looking forward to teaching the concept of Barkas’ Kinbaku City in Berlin because I think that the people there are very perceptive for this kind of metaphors and poetics. At least in my experience.

Thank you very much! We are really looking forward to it, too.

Do not miss the Barkas & Addie Masterclass at Karada House:

07nov(nov 7)11:0008(nov 8)18:30FeaturedBarkas & Addie Masterclass – The City of Kinbaku (mixed)11:00 - 18:30 (8) Facilitator: Barkas & Addie Category:shibariFormat:workshop


Reflecting on 20 weeks of Karada House

Reflecting on 20 weeks of Karada House

We remember precisely the moment we stepped into the old stable that would become Karada House on a hot July summer day. It is not often that you enter a space and you know right away that this is the perfect match. It was not what we had envisioned, the timing was off, our funding unprepared but standing there in all the dust and dirt, we knew we’d try.

Now, twenty weeks later Karada has become for us and hopefully for some of our visitors, participants and helpers, a sanctuary that lends its space to the most wonderful and wondrous events and moments. Karada House took 3 weeks to build and facilitated 80 events in the 4,5 months that followed. The beginning  was pure insanity, what followed was instinctual or through a need to fulfill our own wishes, desires and needs. 

Karada is, and this may  not be clear to everyone, a collaborative project between Caritia, Mamana & René de Sans. This entire house is run by three people. In their “free” time, with the help of volunteers and supporters. We have yet to wrap our own minds around this fact and that it is working, albeit with a lot of unpaid labour from our side. Karada is our sanctuary, born out of a deep need we had and we are happy to share it with you and also be open about the process.

Now that we allow ourselves a short winter break, we finally get to reflect on what has happened, what we did, what Karada is becoming and where we could approve. We’d like to share our collective reflections with you.

The lounge area before renovation.
The stable hall before renovation.
The bubble room before renovation.

Queer. Safe(r). Space

Karada House is not for everyone. We set out to create a space that is best described as a queer safe(r) space. Queer because we identify as queer people and because we all had the need to experience kink and body work, art and rituals in a queer community. We consciously offer events for a mixed audience as well. “Mixed” we define as an audience that includes everybody as long as they are allies and understand that a queer safe(r) space is a bit of a different thing, has different requirements and necessities than a predominantly non-queer space. After giving this a try we have now learnt that

  1. it is possible and can be extremely fruitful, fun and deeply connecting to have groups that consist of queer people and non-queers that come together on eye-level
  2. in a space like ours that puts its priorities on being a queer safe(r) space it becomes clear very quickly if someone in the house does not respect its rules and its primary audience.
  3. mixed groups and groups that are queers & womxn only, have very different vibes and energies. Both are great, and we realize that it is indeed good as well as necessary to have spaces solely for queers & womxn where we/they can be amongst our/themselves as this allows for a different kind of atmosphere, connection and sometimes healing.

The tearing down of a wall.

Being safe(r)

We wish to be a safe(r) space. We realize that no space is ever completely safe, however our intention is to put our energy into making it as safe as possible. Therefore we have implemented some rules and regulations. We have a strict door policy and a list of people that are not permitted  into the house due to known and/or experienced boundary and consent violations. Currently our list has 22 people on it. We also have an anti-abuse-policy in place that is somewhat of an experiment, which is currently working well. The policy aims for prevention, allowing people to listen to their gut feelings about people and situations. 

In our house you can call “yellow” and discreetly point at a person that you have a bad feeling about or had an interaction with that made you uncomfortable. We will then keep an eye on that person. You can choose to keep interacting with that person but you know you are not alone and we have your back. No “yellows” have been called so far.

You can call “orange” if something or someone’s concrete actions or words make you uncomfortable. Typically these moments are in a gray area that many people know and upon reflection after something happened know that this is when they should have walked away/intervened etc. Orange moments are in our opinion and experience the most important ones. They happen right before an actual boundary or consent violation takes place. If someone calls “orange” in our house, we (gently) intervene and talk to the person who is making others uncomfortable. We end a situation before boundaries are crossed by asking the person to stop and assess their words/behaviour either by themselves or with our help. We also take the person that feels uncomfortable and/or triggered out of the equation as they are emotionally in turmoil. We have had 6 orange call-outs for 4 different people so far. Depending on their reactions and actions after the call-out, they have either been asked not to come back to the house or have reflected, learnt and changed their approach and remained part of the house. 

Our experience until now shows that sometimes “orange” call-outs happen because the person that makes others feel uncomfortable has a lack of awareness or lack of communication skills as well as an  non- /or limited awareness of their own boundaries. Other times they were deliberate attempts to cross other people’s boundaries.

If you call “red”, we consider this call as a clear boundary or consent violation and we immediately remove the person from the house and set up another date at a different time to discuss the matter. We choose not to engage in a discussion in the moment a red is called, but later when everyone involved feels clear and stable enough to engage in an accountability process. No “red” has been called in our house so far.

The stable hall entry before renovation.
The ramp before renovation.
The lounge area without pink floor.

Takashi’s Castle Syndrome

Another aspect of being a queer safe(r) space is keeping our own space safe and being firm with our boundaries. This has turned out to be one of the most time and energy consuming things so far. There is a dynamic in place that we have come to call Takashi’s Castle Syndrome. In short: for some non-queer individuals it has become a game or a challenge to try to breach our boundaries and see if and how far they can insert themselves into events that they are not demographic audience of. We are not surprised that this is happening. We are however astounded by the extent of it. Takashi’s Castle Syndrome falls into three categories: 

But I am one of the “good ones”/”different”

There are non-queer individuals that think and argue that they can come to and be allowed at queers & womxn events because they do not consider themselves a threat or consider themselves “woke” and different and therefore expect to be above our rules and regulations. We have literally had people at the door arguing that they are “nice guys”, “allies”, “one of the good ones” or “non-toxic-masculine” etc. Not realizing that by demanding entry and ignoring our rules they prove themselves to be the opposite of what they claim to be.

Pure power play

The other category consists of non-queer individuals that feel personally challenged by a space that is not for them and cannot or will not accept that fact. They either blatantly ignore that certain events are not for them and buy a ticket or show up at the door and then start to argue. They have also snug into events in the beginning before we had our closed door policy. We literally have two closed doors now because of these individuals who wish to push themselves in. We even had people try to enter the house that were told in advance  that they were not permitted to enter the house because of their behaviour towards us on social media etc. Who still showed up and demanded that we explain to them why they cannot be in the house and that we explain to them why a queer safe(r) space is needed in the first place. 

Queer is a joke

The third category consists of individuals that wish to attend queer & womxn events and ridicule the idea or necessity of these closed spaces. They usually make jokes about dressing “queer” (i.e. dressing in clothes of the opposed gender within the gender binary) like wearing pink tights, a “girly blouse and skirt” etc. indicating that this should be enough to “pass” as “queer”. 

The lounge area with pink floor.

Solidarity is a two-way-street 

The call for solidarity or support within the queer community is something we have also experienced in different ways. We are so grateful for the people who have helped us build this space. Some gave their free time and work force, others built or gifted us things and items. Some individuals donated things to us that we could have never afforded ourselves but were absolutely essential. Without these generous souls we would not be what we are. Also our volunteers are amazing and offer their time and skills to the house, relieving the three of us from a lot of work that would simply crush us in the long run. Some of our facilitators and artists also gave their skills for free or reduced price so we could get started.

We also try to support and give solidarity back. Most of our events have soli tickets or sliding scales, you can volunteer and  exchange work for workshops etc. And if push comes to shove you can always send us a message and we will see what we can do. We have however heard that some find our prices too high and not inclusive enough. It’s sad for us to only hear this through the grapevine and not directly. Our prices are what they are to ensure we can maintain the safety and sustainability of our temporary location. We know it is hard to navigate the precarious situations many queer folx living in Berlin (as well as other parts of the world) and offer our space, however solidarity is a two-way-street. If we do not work in a way that is sustainable and get solidarity back via ticket sales and the occasional supporter ticket, there will be no space. We need solidarity through money energy. Our aim is to stay afloat and to ensure we pay facilitators and artists as well. 

Our lived experience: often when we give a free ticket, this ticket and its value is actually not appreciated and the person does not show up in the end.

Canceling workshops

A big part of our sustainability is also our ticket system. We chose this method to see whether  an event is actually being picked up by enough people to actually go ahead. Yes, you can purchase at the door most of the time, however if we see that numbers are low  we can directly ask the facilitator if they want to go ahead or abort. Most abort as time and energy are precious and the gamble is – especially for queer or otherwise marginalized facilitators – too high. We understand and support that, even when it means that the space makes no money at all when that happens. This is also part of our solidarity principle and we hope this explains why we sometimes cancel an event. 

Performance by Bishop Black on opening night.
Performance by Xa Na and Miss Mila on opening night.
Performance by Gestalta, Shantel Liao & Miauleks.

What we wish to do better

Karada has happened so rapidly and making it was overwhelming to begin with, we basically  ran along and winged it. We made a lot of mistakes, mostly in how we communicated. It took us a while to find an approach that is right for us. In particular how to deal with individuals who are/were not welcome at the house. On occasion we should have been clearer and direct, we shall be more so in the future.

Karada is also a space where pronouns acknowledgement is very important. We always ask about them, however we also fuck them up. We are adamant about doing a much better job on that in the future. 

We are also positively surprised by the amount of neurodivergent people visiting us and  we recognise we have much to learn in this area. We need to learn more about these topics and how we can facilitate and host neurodivergent people better. If you have any suggestions where to read up on that topic, please let us know. 

We close in celebration of what we as a collaborative team have been able to offer through the vehicle of Karada House. Our deepest gratitude goes out to everyone who has supported us, in their various ways. We acknowledge and salute you. We look forward to what 2020 has in store and for your critical and loving feedback.

Shibari photoshoot with Gestalta & OliviaLilith666.
Self suspension photoshoot with Kaleb.

Over to you

Our house rules state that we are always open to constructive criticism and suggestions for improvement. And we have received some here and there which were wonderful and helpful. We are, in the end, simply three people trying their best and running an entire space in their “free time”. Our view is different from yours. So we’d love to hear from you. If you have been at the house and if you wish to share your constructive criticism, feel free to do so. We have had several moments where we heard about problems and misunderstandings that were discussed with others but not with us. 

We encourage and invite you to talk to us or (if you are shy) send us your messages –
info@karada-house.de


Sincerely,
Caritia, Mamana & René


Vernissage: Shantel Liao

Vernissage: November 22
Exhibition November 23 to January 30.

Shantel Liao was born in Taipei, Taiwan. The long journey between North America, Europe and Asia has been continuing since the age eighteen.

She started with photography and later mixed-media calligraphy. Shantel is fascinated by the power of identity nowadays, how it shaped us in various ways, physically and mentally. From gender to culture, how people connected with their own history and the greater environment.

Artists Website: shantelliao.com


Vernissage: René de Sans

Collected works from René de Sans..

Vernissage and Exhibition from September 23th to November 15th.

René de Sans is a visual artist with a focus on photography and film. His primary artistic interests lies on the exploration of human bodies and visual, visceral and psychological landscapes, that express, incarnate, question and deconstruct ideas of identity, gender, sexuality and taboo.

Artists Website: renedesans.net